Each didactic course credit is equal to 11 classroom hours. Each Clinic credit is equal to 25 clinic hours.


ASIAN MEDICINE COURSES

AS 101 Asian Medicine I: Fundamental Principles 4 Cr.

Fundamental Principles introduces students to the basic concepts upon which traditional Chinese medicine is founded. Philosophical and ideological concepts are introduced within an historical and modern clinical context. Basic subjects include: Taoism, YinYang, 5 Elements, 8 Principles, Vital Substances: Qi, Blood and Body Fluids, causes of disease, emotions, and functions of the Zang Fu and their interrelationships. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Program.

AS 102 Asian Medicine II: Zang Fu 4 Cr.

This course explores the various interrelationships between the Zang Fu “organ systems” and how imbalances of the Vital Substances create imbalances within these systems. Topics covered include the causes of disease, symptom patterns, the foundations of differential diagnosis, and appropriate treatment strategies for dysfunctions of the Zang Fu. Prerequisite: Asian Medicine I.

AS 103–104 Asian Medicine III: Diagnostic Skills I, II 4 Cr.

This two course series explores the foundations of patient assessment skills according to Asian medical principles. Topics covered include the Four Examinations: Looking, Palpating, Asking, and Listening/Smelling. Through lecture and practice, students develop the ability to gain patient information in a comprehensive manner in order to form an accurate diagnosis. Special emphasis is placed on tongue, pulse diagnosis and palpatory skills. Prerequisite: Asian Medicine I.

AS 105 Asian Medicine IV: Diagnostic Systems 3 Cr.

Asian Medical Theory IV focuses on the further development of diagnostic skills. Students learn to differentiate signs and symptoms according to the following traditional diagnostic systems: Four Levels, Three Jiaos, Six Stages, Eight Extraordinary Vessels, and Pathologies of Qi, Blood and Body Fluids. Prerequisites: Asian Medicine II and III.

AS 110–112 Meridians and Points I-III (Lecture and Lab.) 12 Cr.

This course sequence examines the study of acupuncture points along the 12 regular meridians and the two Extraordinary Vessels, the Governing and Conception Vessels. Western anatomical landmarks and the systems of point location are discussed. Included in the study of the meridians is their functions and internal and external routes, and the Luo, Divergent, and Sinew channels. The study of the acupuncture points includes the point name (Chinese character, Pinyin and translations), location, traditional energetic functions, special categories of points, indications and contraindications, therapeutic combinations of points, and systems of measurement for point location. Co-Requisite: Asian Medicine I; Prerequisites: (Meridians and Points II & III): Meridians and Points I &
 II respectively.

AS 200–202 TuiNa I-III 6 Cr.

This acupressure series introduces the active Chinese system of massage. This hands-on technique employs the stimulation of acupuncture points, meridians, and other types of manual stimulation in an effort to bring about a relaxing and therapeutic effect. Prerequisites: Meridians and Points III, (Tui Na II & III): Tui Na I & II respectively.

AS 210–212  Acupuncture Techniques I-III (Lecture and Lab.) 12 Cr.

The Acupuncture Therapeutic Techniques sequence teaches a variety of needling techniques pertinent to the practice of acupuncture. This series also includes the development and use of therapeutic principles, numerous needling styles, and contraindications for various techniques. The practical portions are designed to assure competency in Clean Needle Technique, materials preparation, and precautions. Also included in this series are the adjunct techniques of moxibustion (rice grain, cone, pole, etc.), cupping, gwasha, electro-stimulation, microbleeding, and the microsystems of the scalp and ear. Emphasis is placed on patient safety. Prerequisites: (Acupuncture Techniques I): Meridians and Points III and Asian Medicine IV,
(Acupuncture Techniques II & III): Acupuncture Techniques I & II respectively.

AS 300–302 5 Elements I-III 6 Cr.

The philosophy and therapeutics of the 5 Element Theory as developed and depicted in both China and Europe are explored. This course introduces the ideas, images, functions, and therapies used in this natural approach to healing. Prerequisite: Acupuncture Therapeutic Techniques III.

AS 310–311 Japanese Acupuncture I, II 4 Cr. (M.Ac only)

Japanese acupuncture has developed many of its own systems of needling techniques and diagnosis. This course series explores the varieties of styles and introduces the student to a deeper understanding of Hara diagnosis and techniques of meridian therapy. Prerequisites: Asian Medicine IV, Meridians and Points III.


AS 120 Chinese Culture and Worldview 2 Cr.

This course explores the essence of Chinese culture and how it was shaped by geography, philosophy, history, religion and cosmology. Such topics as tea ceremony, calligraphy and gardening are all used to exemplify the development of the Chinese world view. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters program.

AS 121 Chinese Medical History 2 Cr.

Chinese Medical History explores the history of medicine in China. Using the context of both ancient and modern Chinese culture, philosophy, world view, and outside influences, this course examines the evolution and development of the evolution of Chinese medicine. Prerequisite: Chinese Culture and Worldview.


AS 130 Introduction to Chinese Herbology 2 Cr.

Introduction to Chinese Herbology is a survey course that provides an overview of Chinese herbal medicine which focuses on the historical development of herbal medicine, the ways in which herbs are cultivated and harvested, specific techniques exploring the ways herbs are stored, prepared and processed, as well as examining the clinical utility of Chinese herbs. Also included are the general categories of herbs and the process involved when developing a prescription. Prerequisite: Asian Medicine III.

AS 230–231 Asian Nutrition I, II 4 Cr.

The Asian Nutrition sequence examines the nature and functions of foods as curative and preventative health measures. The course explores the energetic qualities of foods and food combinations and focuses on diet as an adjunct to traditional acupuncture therapy. Prerequisites: Asian Medicine III, (Asian Nutrition II): Asian Nutrition I.

AS 320–326 Asian Acupuncture Therapeutics Series 18 Cr. (M.Ac only)

(Digestive 2 Cr., Respiratory 2 Cr., Circulatory 2 Cr., Orthopedics and Sports Medicine I, II 4 Cr., ObGyn/Uro 4 Cr., Immunology 2 Cr., Psychiatry 2 Cr.) This course sequence is a comprehensive study of the various conditions which can affect the various physiological systems.
Each system is examined in terms of its presentation of signs and symptoms and how these are interpreted within the
pattern framework of Asian medicine. Students will use diagnostic skills previously learned and develop the most
appropriate diagnosis and treatment for each condition. Presentations are clinically based. This results in a thorough
examination of the various conditions encountered in clinical medicine with appropriate therapeutic interventions using
acupuncture and related therapeutic modalities. Prerequisites: Asian Medicine IV, Meridians and Points III.


CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE COURSES

HS 200–202 Chinese Materia Medica I-III 10 Cr. (MAOM only)

The Materia Medica course sequence is a comprehensive study of the individual herbs of the Chinese materia medica. Herbal substances are analyzed at length, including such aspects as their individual nature and origin, method of preparation, traditional therapeutic properties, indications and contraindications, and dosage. Prerequisites: Zang Fu Pathology and Introduction to Chinese Herbology.

HS 210–212 Chinese Herbal Prescriptions I-III 10 Cr. (MAOM only)

The Herbal Prescriptions sequence is a comprehensive study of the traditional Chinese medical formulary. This series explores the critical aspects of herbal combinations and focuses on classical prescriptions and their modifications according to therapeutic categories. Prerequisites: Chinese Materia Medica I & II, Co-Requisite: Chinese Materia Medica III.

HS 275 Patent Herbal Medicines 2 Cr. (MAOM only)

This course examines individually prepared Chinese medicine formulas manufactured in both the U.S. and China. Topics include symptomotology, cautions and contraindications, dosage, and recent FDA research regarding some imported Chinese patent formulas. Prerequisites: Chinese Materia Medica I & II.

HS 330–336 Asian Medical Therapeutics Series 27 Cr.

(Digestive 3 Cr., Respiratory 3 Cr., Circulatory 3 Cr., Orthopedics and Sports Medicine I, II 6 Cr., ObGyn/Uro 5 Cr., Dermatology 2 Cr., Immunology 2 Cr., Psychiatry 3 Cr.) This course sequence is a comprehensive study of the various conditions which can affect the various physiological
systems. Each system is examined in terms of its presentation of signs and symptoms and how these are interpreted
within the pattern framework of Asian medicine. Students will use diagnostic skills previously learned and develop
the most appropriate diagnosis and treatment for each condition. Presentations are clinically based. This results in a
thorough examination of the various conditions encountered in clinical medicine with appropriate therapeutic interventions
using both acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. Prerequisites: Asian Medicine IV, Meridians and Points III, Chinese Materia Medica III, Co-Requisite:
Chinese Herbal Prescriptions III.

HS 400–410 Chinese Herbal Classics I, II 4 Cr. (MAOM only)

The Herbal Classics series examines the history and development of Chinese herbal medicine. The course focuses on the ancient Masters of herbal medicine, classical herbal texts, and the cultural contexts within which this aspect of Chinese medicine developed. Prerequisites: Chinese Materia Medica III, Chinese Herbal Prescriptions III.


WESTERN MEDICINE COURSES

WS100  Surface Anatomy 2.5 Cr.

This elective course focuses on superficial landmarks on the body, including bones, tendons, arteries, veins and nerves. Class discussion also examines the role of fascia and the skin in human anatomy and physiology. The majority of class time is devoted to developing palpatory skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Program.

WS 101 Survey of Western Clinical Medicine 3 Cr.

This course exposes the student to the variety of western clinical modalities available within Western medical practice. Guest lecturers include, but are not limited to, practitioners of allopathy, osteopathy, chiropractic, homeopathy, massage, craniosacral, etc. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Program.

WS 201 Medical Referral 2 Cr.

This course presents protocols according to the Western diagnostic system for distinguishing normal from abnormal conditions. Principle signs and symptoms, assessment skills, and treatment modalities are examined with special consideration given to those conditions which need referral. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters program.

WS 202 Western Laboratory Medicine 3 Cr.

This course explores common Western medical laboratory tests and examinations. Included are the clinical significance of these tests and their diagnostic use in clinical medicine. This course helps students to gain confidence in communicating with their patients and other allied health care professionals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Program.

WS 210 Pharmacology 3 Cr.

This course introduces the major classes, benefits, and side effects of commonly prescribed drugs in western medicine. The course also examines pharmaceuticals which may be abused and the effects that various drugs may have on individuals who become dependent on their usage. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Program.

WS 215 Pharmacognosy 2 Cr. (MAOM only)

This course explores the biochemical components of herbs and other natural substances and examines the pharmaceutical interactions with herbal remedies. Prerequisites: Pharmacology

WS 200 Western Medical Terminology 1 Cr.

This course studies Western medical terminology and nomenclature including Latin word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Emphasis is placed on anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Prerequisites: Acceptance into either Masters program.

WS 220–221 Western Clinical Nutrition I, II 4 Cr.

This course studies the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids as well as the function of the various micro nutrients. Diet as a major factor in health is discussed as well as identifying illness due to food related issues. Prerequisites: Acceptance into either Masters program, (Western Clinical Nutrition II): Western Clinical Nutrition I.

WS 300–304 Western Clinical Pathology Series 16 Cr.

(Immunology/Dermatology 2 Cr., Urology 2 Cr., Digestive 2 Cr., Respiratory/Circulatory 3 Cr., ObGyn 3 Cr., Psychiatry 2 Cr., Ortho/Sports Med. 2 Cr.) The Western Clinical Pathology series examines the processes of metabolic dysfunction and pathophysiology that affects each of the primary physiological systems. Students learn appropriate western assessment and referral, review pharmaceuticals and laboratory tests, and discuss western principles of treatment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters program.

WS 310–311 Practice Management I, II 5 Cr.

Practice Management delves into the practical aspects of setting up an independent health care practice. Topics covered include the law and ethics, malpractice issues, hygiene, bookkeeping and billing techniques, marketing, equipment needs, physical space requirements, and establishing protocols with other medical professionals. Prerequisites: Acceptance into either Masters program, (Practice Management II): Practice Management I.

WS 320 The Health Care Practitioner 4 Cr.

This course examines the cultivation of the skills necessary to become a compassionate, present, skilled health care practitioner. Issues involving communication skills, attitude, ethics, the ability to interact with various cultural, economic, and racial groups, and problem solving are comprehensively explored. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters program.

IS 100–103 Independent Study 1-4 credits

The Independent Study course allows students, under the guidance of a faculty sponsor, to pursue learning and/or research projects in a specific area of their interest. The student must seek prior approval of the independent study proposal by the Academic Dean before registering. The completion of the study will result in a final written report.


MIND/BODY MEDICINE

MB 100–103 Qigong I-IV 4 Cr.

This course sequence develops methods of promoting internal awareness and cultivation through controlling the movement of Qi. Breathing, movement exercises, and focused internal attention are practiced weekly for the first two years of both programs. These disciplines promote a sense of personal well-being and provide the experiential understanding necessary to understand the healing power of Qi Prerequisites: Acceptance into either Masters Program. (Qigong II, III, IV): Qigong I, II, III respectively.

MB 104–107 Medical Qigong V-VIII 4 Cr.

This course is a continuation of Qigong I-IV and focuses primarily on using Qigong for the balancing of energy in others. Prerequisites: (Qigong V, VI, VII, VIII): Qigong IV, V, VI, VII respectively.

MB 200 Introduction to Energy Field Medicine 2 Cr.

This course explores the current concepts of the auric field and the different energetic bodies: etheric, astral/emotional, mental, etc. This exploration is based on materials from various world cultures and recent scientific research. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters program.


LANGUAGE STUDIES

LS 140–147  Chinese Medical Language I-VIII 16 Cr.

The Chinese Medical Language series introduces Mandarin Chinese, focusing on the skills necessary for reading traditional Chinese medical language. The series progresses from learning basic pronunciation, dictionary use, and character construction and recognition to translating and reading current journal articles. This course will introduce both the traditional characters and simplified characters. Approximately 550 characters will be learned in this series. Prerequisites: Acceptance into either Masters Program or licensed practitioner. (Chinese Medical Language II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII): Chinese Medical Language I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII respectively.


CLINICAL STUDIES

CS 100  Clinic Observation Orientation 1 Cr.

This course prepares first year students to enter AIMS Community Clinic as observers. Topics covered include introduction to clinic protocols, paperwork, introduction to OSHA standards, requirements for Observers within the clinic setting, and emergency procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Programs.

CS 150 Clinic Intern Orientation 1 Cr.

This course deepens the student’s understanding of working in the clinic and prepares them for the Internship portion of their education. Topics covered include clinic policies, procedures as they move through the curriculum and become more independent in their level of responsibility, case presentation and management, SOAP charting protocols and chart integrity, the clinic intern competency system, OSHA standards, and appropriate paperwork. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of 100 hours of Clinic Observation and successful completion of the First Year Comprehensive examination, HIV/AIDS Education, Clean Needle Technique and current CPR/First Aid card.

CS 210–217 Clinic Observation I-VIII 150 hours

The first portion of this clinic series, Clinic Observation I, takes place in a classroom setting. Students observe licensed acupuncture professionals come into the classroom and do an entire intake and treatment within the course of two hours. Each week a different practitioner participates in this way, giving the student a wide variety of styles to observe. The Observation II-IV portions of the clinic program take place in the AIMS Community clinic, where students observe both professional acupuncturists as well as senior interns in practice. Here the concepts learned in the Clinic Observation Orientation are reinforced. Prerequisite: Acceptance into either Masters Programs, participation in the Clinic Observation Orientation, and satisfactory progress in first year courses.

CS 300–320 Clinic Internship: Acupuncture 700 hours (M.Ac only)

Clinic Internship deepens the students integration of their didactic education by allowing them to do patient intakes, develop a diagnosis and treatment strategy, and perform acupuncture under the guidance and supervision of a licensed acupuncturist. Students working in the teaching clinic progressively take on more responsibility as they move through the various levels of internship, from working with other interns as a team, to complete independence with only approval of the treatment plan and techniques from clinic faculty. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the First Year Comprehensive Exam and Acupuncture Techniques I.

CS 350–370 Clinic Internship: Acupuncture and Herbs 800 hours (MAOM only)

This internship program is specific to the MTCM program and allows for the same level of integration and progression movement as the Acupuncture Internship, except that this program integrates acupuncture and herbal medicine in treatment options and strategy. The first portion of the internship focuses more on acupuncture, and as students become more familiar with herbs in their didactic education, these are integrated more into the treatment plans. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the First Year Comprehensive Exam and Acupuncture Techniques I and Chinese Materia Medica II.

CS 475 Clinic Internship: Herbal Dispensary 50 hours (MAOM only)

Herbal Dispensary allows students to fill raw herbal prescriptions for the herbal clinic under the supervision of a clinical faculty. Prerequisites: Chinese Herbal Prescriptions I plus 300 hours of Clinic Internship.